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20121012
20121012
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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
, he strengthened america with the focus on federal budget, civil rights, education, and the environment. in the white house, leon panetta was director of the office of management budget and chief of staff, fostering policies that led to a balanced budget in the 1990s making america stronger. at the central intelligence agency, he enabled a spirited response to international terrorism with notable results, disrupting and defeating terror networks. as the nation's 23rd sex tear of defense, leon panetta struck a balance as a force of the advocate for efficiencies also standing resolute in favor of an adequately funded military. bens is pleased to bestow the award recognizing those outstanding americans whose contributions to the country reflect security as the total product of our economic, intellectual, moral, and military strength. secretary panetta. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. thank you so much for this wonderful evening and the chance to enjoy some terrific company and be able to express my deepest gratitude to this organization for all
that was supportive of the mission. and, in fact, we thought many longhorn court battles to the civil rights era to make sure these groups would not have to disclose their donors to people. melanie is right that it's this kind of odd that we're requiring disclosure of low amounts given drug to candidates but not large amounts not given drafted to candidates. i'm open to adjustments. i think if we allow changes made on both ends, i do think when it understands that there's a fundamental difference. there's not been a retreat on disclosure. what is being proposed as disclosure like we have never had before in our countries history, tracking a people's political entity. >> jump in the. one of the things that comes to mind to me is simply as the game has changed, so has the ability to turn around disclosure and itemization quickly. >> i actually want to talk about the irs. i like talk about boring subjects that can deliver that the path i can never get out of. but the irs is the agency that is supposed to regulate social welfare nonprofits. social welfare nonprofits, 501(c)(4) groups, the main group
, and such unlawful practice in 2b would have been a violation of the civil rights act of 1964, and the equal employment opportunity act. those things would have immediately discouraged anybody from hiring anyone because they would have been sued no matter what. this kind of stuff is outrageously bad government by any standard whether you're a democrat or republican. it doesn't make any sense. >> steve, ron baron is standing by. he's been a long-term investor and he's got a question for you as well. ron? >> hi, steve. thanks for coming on the show. >> hi, ron. it's a pleasure. nice to see you. >> great to see you, too. so i've been friends with steve and i have invested with steve since 1980 and we were one of the first investors, one of the first three investors in wynn resorts in 19 -- in 2001, 2000-2001, market cap was then $1 billion. and one of the things that was interesting to me, we went out to visit you and we stayed in your home that night and went to a show at the bellagio and we were talking through the bellagio and we saw one person after another who worked there would keep comin
america with his focus on budget, civil rights education and the environment. in the white house he served as director of the office of management budget and his chief of staff brought policies that brought a balanced budget in the 1990's making america stronger. he enabled a response to international terrorism with notable results disrupting and defeating terror networks. as the 2323rd secretary of defense he sought efficient sis while standing resslute in fafere of an adequately funded military. we are pleased to bestow the 2011 award recognizing those outstanding americans who is contributions to the country of security as the total product of our economic intellectual moral strength. secretary panetta. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. thank you so much for this wonderful evening and the chance to enjoy some terrific company and be able to express my deepest gratitude to this organization for all of the great things that it does on behalf of those that serve in our military. bruce, my greatest thanks to you for your kind remarks and your leadership here. and i accept this a
, with civil unions, i would support repealing the marriage yet giving civil-rights to those who are of same-sex orientation. >> i support marriage equality. i was on an airplane last spring when i -- when a man sitting next to me started a conversation and said that he recruits for new hampshire's business and marriage equality is a major recruitment tool for him because people are going to our state because we want to include all people of talent and energy in our economy. on this, along with the issues surrounding women's health care, women's access to cancer screening and the funding of planned parenthood has extreme agenda pin he will sign those bills should they come to his desk as gov.. >> i think the record is very clear as far as what the agenda should be. it should be about jobs and the economy. that is what people have said in this state. that is the focus i will bring. i will be a leader for a change here in new hampshire, working with our legislature to get a right agenda set and the right agenda is about jobs and the economy. >> earlier this evening, a coin flip was held to see
universal rights and create space for civil society, a message i delivered at the highest level in a person in february. now what do these snapshots and stories from across the region tell us? on the one hand, last month's violence revealed strains of extremism that threatened those nations as well as the broader region and even the united states. on the other hand we've seen actions that would have been hard to imagine a few years ago. the democratically elected leaders and free people in the arab countries standing up for a peaceful pluralist future. it is way too soon to see how these transitions will play out. but what is not in doubt is that america has a big stake in the outcome. last month at the united nations general assembly in new york, i met with leaders from across the region. and i told each of them that the united states will continue to pursue a strategy to support emerging democracies as they were to provide effective security grounded and the rule will fall to spur economic growth and bolster space institutions. we have made those three priorities the hallmark of america's
sending americans to do the job but fewer of them. >> biden: that's right. we are sending in more afghans to do the job. afghans to do the job. >> let's move to the civil war in syria. 25,000 to 30,000 people have now been killed. president obama explained the military action taken by libya, by saying it was in the national interest to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. so why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? >> biden: it's a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one-fifth the population that is libya. it's in a part of the world where they are not going to see whatever would come from that war. it would seep into a regional war. you are in a country that is heavily populated in the midst of the most dangerous area in the world, and if in fact it blows up and the wrong people gain control it will have impact on the entire region. we are working hand and glove with the turks, the jar dannians, the saudis and all of the people in the region. attempting to identify the people who deserve the help so whe
the job. >> no, we're sending americans to do the job, fewer of them. >> that's right, we're sending more afghans to do the job. more afghans to do the job. >> let's move to another war, the civil war in syria, where there are estimates that more than 25,000, 30,000 people have now been killed. in march of last year, president obama explained the military action taken in libya by saying it was in the national interest to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? >> it's a different country. it's a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one fifth the population that is libya. one fifth the population, five times as large geographically. you would not see whatever would come from that war, would seep into a regional war. are you in a count you are in a country that is heavily populated, in the most dangerous area in the world. and if, in fact, it blows up, the wrong people gain control it will have impact on the entire region, causing potentially regional wars. we're working hand in glove with the turks,
are already sending meshes in, but fewer of them. >> that's right. we are sending in more afghans to do the job! afghans to do the job. >> martha: let's move to the civil war in syria. there are estimates that more than 25,000, 30,000 people have been killed. in march of last year, president obama explained the military action taken in libya, by saying it was in the national interests to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. so why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? >> it's a different country. it is 5 times as large geographically. it has one-fifth the population, that is libbia, one-fifth the population, five times as large. it's in a part of the world where they are not going to see whatever would come from that war, would seep into a regional war. you are in a country that is heavily populated in the midst of the most dangerous area newscast world. and in fact, if in fact, it blows up and the wrong people gain control, it's going to have impact on the entire region, causing potentially regional wars. we are working hand and glove with the turks, with the jord
to do the job. ryan: we are, but fewer of them. biden: that's right, more afghans to do the job. afghans to do the job. >> moderator: moving to another war. the civil war in syria where there's estimated 30,000 people killed. in march of last year, president obama explained to the military action taken in libya by saying it was in the national interest to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? biden: it's a different country. it's a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one fifth the population that is libya, one fifth the population, five times larger geographically in a part of the world they will not see whatever comes from that war seeping into a regional war. you are in a country that's heavily populated in the midst of the most dangerous area in the world, and, in fact, if, in fact, it blows up in and the wrg people gain control, it's going to have impact on the entire region causing potentially regional wars. we are working hand-and-glove with the turks, the senior -- jordannians, and the s
, but fewer of them. biden: that's right. we're sending in more afghans to do the job. afghans to do the job. >> moderator: let's move to another war, the civil war in syria where there are estimates that more than 25,000, 30,000 people have now been killed. in march of last year, president obama explained the military action taken in libya by saying it was in the national interest to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. so why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? biden: different country. it's a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one-fifth the population, that is libya, one-fifth the population, five times as large geographically. it's a part of the world where they're not going to see whatever would come from that war seep into a regional war. you're in a country that is heavily populated in the midst of the most dangerous area in the world. and, in fact, if, in fact, it blows up and the wrong people gain control, it's going to have impact on the entire region causing potentially regional wars. we are working hand and glove with the t
a revolution, if i do it, what is going to happen? another civil war or what is going to happen, what is he going to bring about? the second one is that one of the most important things, and i think hugh roberts this morning was right i think, is that there is no coordination between, you know, of the social economic and political grievances. for there is no opposition that is capable of channeling the socioeconomic grievances and turning them into political demands. if you recall and 2011 you had more or less to movement. one that was make social economic demands and then a smaller one, and it was nicknamed -- you know, went ahead of the rcp was making demonstrations and had some political demands, you know, he was ridiculed just because there's no anchorage. opposition, i think algiers is one of the few countries and work with the opposition never expires to come to power. i'm very serious. you have a political party, they criticize but they don't aspire to come to power. th only one that was capable of coming to power was the fif. the regime was extremely astute and not allow that. and s
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)